A bit of history and some stories about vintage bikes for sale

’75 Honda CB750 Cafe’ Racer

I love Cafe’ Racers…always have, always will. There is just something so completely right about a well done Cafe’ Racer. They are purposeful motorcycles, designed and built to go from point A to point B quickly with no muss, no fuss. And, when done right, in fine style. A clean Cafe Racer will always attract a crowd no matter where it is parked. While you’re inside the local gas station convenience store getting your afternoon Red Bull, the guy pumping regular into his wife’s(?) minivan will walk over and give your bike the ‘I wish I was riding this’ look over. When you ride it to work, it’s guaranteed that at least half your workmates will look at your motorcycle both coming to work and going to lunch…and, they do it every time you ride to work. Non riders will look at your Cafe Racer and ask questions like “isn’t that uncomfortable to ride?” or, “where does the passenger sit?”. Most fellow riders at the Sunday morning ride breakfast stop, no matter what they ride, will admire your bike and the work you put into it.

The true appreciation however, of a well built Cafe’ Racer comes from one place and one place only. You. You are the one that visualized your Cafe’ Racer. You are the one that knows all the little details of what went into building your bike. You know how every part feels and fit’s together…and the ones that didn’t!?. The time, the money, and then more time and money. Speaking of more money, you also add in what I call the ‘might as wells’…those are the things that you go ahead and do because you did one thing so you ‘might as well’ do two more or, you’ve already spent this much money, so you ‘might as well’ spend this much more. I’m assuming you’re a single guy here.

Once it’s all built, you sit in your garage on Saturday night with a couple of friends, who have listened to all your dreams for this bike, and all the fit’s of depression when things weren’t coming together like you wanted. Friends who are tired of looking at all the before during and after pictures. Friends that just want to go riding with you and your creation tomorrow morning.

Tomorrow morning comes, you roll your Cafe Racer out of the garage into the sunlight (it never rains in this dream by the way…) where you just stand, staring at what you’ve built. Key in the ignition, set the choke, fold out the kickstart lever (proper cafe racers don’t have electric starters…button’s are for wimps) and with one kick your creation barks to life then settles into a soulful idle while you put on your helmet and gloves. As you pull out of the driveway, you catch a glimpse of your neighbor watching you from the kitchen window with a bit of a scowl on his face, your bike isn’t really that loud is it? Nah.

Your Sunday ride is all you hoped it would be. Your friends loved the bike, it drew a crowd at breakfast, even the Highway Patrolman that stopped you for speeding gave your bike a compliment. What a day. By the time you got home you were already planning your next bike.

So how do you get the money to build another Cafe Racer?? You sell this one. That’s how I found this really well done ’75 Honda CB750 Cafe Racer on ebay.

This Honda is really nicely built. Everything that wasn’t necessary was stripped off. The frame was modified for handling improvements, suspension was upgraded a little, the motor was tidied up, a very nice custom made seat / tail section was built as was a sweet oil tank. This CB750 is a great example of what a cafe racer can and should be. There are many more details to be found about this motorcycle and more pictures. Just click on the pics and you could save yourself a lot of the agony of building a custom Cafe Racer. There is one thing I would do if it were mine though…bin the Raasks rearsets. I have had them before and they are too high to be comfortable. Cobble something up from either the stockers or a later model CB750F…you and your hips will be a lot happier.





’75 Honda CB750 Cafe

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